October 7th, 2013

ADA National Network has posted an archived webinar on the issues of web-based business, from August 2013.

"As we have moved from conducting business “face to face” to a culture where you can go “on-line” and conduct research, complete financial transactions, track the status of a package or get “real-time” information in terms of when a bus will arrive at a specific location the implications for people with disabilities are significant. This session will address the accessibility issues associated with the explosion of on-line/internet based information and what the future holds in this arena."

 

Click on the following link to access Webinar Recording

Accessibility of Web Information: Implications for how the Public and Private Sector Conducts Business Archive

Presentation Materials:

Accessibility of Web Information: Implications for how the Public and Private Sector Conducts Business Handout - (RTF)

Accessibility of Web Information: Implications for how the Public and Private Sector Conducts Business Handout - 2 Slides Per Page (PDF)

Accessibility of Web Information: Implications for how the Public and Private Sector Conducts Business Handout - 3 Slides Per Page (PDF)

September 30th, 2013

 

3PlayMedia offers a 22-page white paper on the best practices for creating an accessible university infrastructure based on in-depth research and advice from university administrators, accessibility coordinators, faculty, and disabled students.
 
Web accessibility is one of the most critical issues facing higher education. New web technologies have been a boon for distance and online education, yet 11% of undergraduates have a disability that impairs access to websites and online content. When creating an accessible infrastructure, many questions abound:
  • How can universities align departments to make accessibility a priority?
  • What are the applicable laws?
  • Where will the budget come from?
  • What is the best approach for allocating resources and responsibilities?
September 30th, 2013

From the September 2013 WebAIM newletter:

Quick Tip: Ambiguous Buttons

Much is written on the impact of ambiguous links (such as "click here") on accessibility. Modern web pages and web applications, however, seem to be increasing in the number of ambiguous "Go" buttons that are being used. Such buttons do not generally provide a description of what the button does. This is particularly troublesome when multiple "Go" buttons appear on the same page. Simply replacing "Go" with descriptive text (such as "Search" or "Sign In") provides a more accessible experience for all users.

Visit the WebAIM blog for 10 Easy Accessibility Tips Anyone Can Use as well.

September 23rd, 2013

 

Presented on September 17, 2013 by the Texas AT Network.
 
Topic: With the explosion of portable tablet based computers comes an exciting opportunity to meet the needs of our struggling students. But….not every tablet is right for every student’s needs. Join us as we discuss features of these mobile devices and how to match them to your student’s needs. Resources will be provided to continue the learning after the webinar.
 
Go to http://bit.ly/Rec_Tablets to play the recorded session now. 
Accompanying content website is http://www.tablets4students.wikispaces.com 
 
September 23rd, 2013

 

AbleNet hosted this event which is archived via their site.
 
Since 1998, the Quality Indicators for Assistive Technology (QIAT) Community has focused its efforts on defining a set of descriptors that could serve as over-arching guidelines for quality assistive technology (AT) services. QIAT’s purpose is to guide provision of AT services to improve the educational participation & results for students, ensure quality of services, & increase consistency of services and support implementation of IDEA and other legal mandates. There are basic assumptions that pertain to all areas of QIAT.
  1. All AT services developed & delivered by states or districts are legally correct according to the mandates and expectations of federal and state laws and are aligned to district policies.
  2. AT efforts, at all stages, involve on-going collaborative work by teams which include families & caregivers, school personnel, & other needed individuals.
  3. Multidisciplinary team members involved in AT processes are responsible for following the code of ethics for their specific profession.
 
Presenter: Diana Foster Carl, M.A., L.S.S.P. and Joy Smiley Zabala, Ed.D., ATP
Description: Session Level: Beginner/Intermediate