Volume control, audio quality

Speech Amplifiers and Artifical Larynxs

Some people are able to speak, but cannot project enough volume. This article talks about 2 types of speech hardware: how they work and what models are currently available.

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Technology for People who Stutter

Individuals who stutter may or may not wish to have assistance with modifying their speech. For those who do, a variety of technologies are available. This article summarizes some of the latest options.

Therapeutic Devices

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Accessible Technologies for People With Hearing Loss

People who are deaf or hard of hearing need access to audible information.  This may be:

  • part of a computer interface (such as alerting tones)
  • a movie sound track
  • a voice conversation on the phone

This article covers some of the accessibility solutions for both groups of users.

Computers

Computers usually have error and alerting tones, and both Windows and Macintosh have a setting that flashes the screen whenever the sound is played.

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Accessible Voting

The Help American Vote Act (HAVA) of 2002 mandates that people with disabilities be able to vote independently and privately. This mandate may involve machines that are either specifically designed as accessible alternatives, or are used by all voters but have mandated accessibility features.

Accessible voting machines should have the following capabilities:

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Software and Hardware Media Players

Audio and video files can be played on hardware devices (such as an iPod or portable DVD player), or via software on a computer (such as Windows Media Player or Apple QuickTime). This article discusses what to consider when determining options for making these files available for use by individuals with various types of disabilities.

Hardware media players

Controls: Controls should require minimal hand movement and activation pressure for the benefit of people with dexterity disabilities. Make sure that they are not too easy to activate or too close together.  Multiple controls with different shapes allow blind users to distinguish among them by touch.

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Tips for Better Communication in Classrooms and Other Group Settings

Here are some ways to improve speech communication for hard of hearing people in a group situation:

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Assistive Listening Technology

People who are hard of hearing may have trouble hearing a speaker in a public auditorium or meeting room, even if they use hearing aids or have cochlear implants.  Assistive listening technology is a way your organization can improve the quality and volume of the audio delivered to these audience members.  There are many options. 

This article will cover some of the issues and solutions.

The basic idea of assistive listening systems is that the audio signal is collected and transmitted to units that "feed" into a person's hearing aids or cochlear implant.

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