Technology management

Assistive Technology and Employment

Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which covers employment, specifically covers “purchase of equipment or modifications to existing equipment” as an appropriate accommodation that would allow someone with a disability to accept or retain a job. This article covers how to use information from the ATC and elsewhere to determine what equipment may be appropriate for meeting an employee’s needs.

New Strategies

An employee or potential employee may not have prior experience using accommodations, and may not know what strategies or equipment will best meet their needs. You can search ATC for information about possible solutions based on the following criteria:

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Accommodating Individuals with Multiple Disabilities

Assistive technologies, like their mainstream counterparts, are often designed with assumptions about user capabilities. For example, screen readers for blind users require extensive keyboard use, which may cause problems if the user also has difficulty using their hands. Creative strategies may help people with more than one disability to accomplish their goals using technology.

Consulting with the User

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IPad Peek: See What Your Website Looks Like on an iPad

iPad Peek puts an iPad emulator in your browser window so that you can see how your website will read to the iPad visitors, which can help you increase readability across platforms. (To get a true emulation, you need to disable the Flash plug-in for your browser.)

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Resource Site for Accessible Science

The Institute for Accessible Science has a website that helps you find resources for science education and career development, including assistive technology and accessible laboratory setups. It is focused on biomedical science, and is funded by the National Institute of Health.

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