Speech / language impaired

Etiquette in Communicating with AAC Users

Because communication using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) may be much slower or more difficult to understand than standard speech, many people may try to interrupt to finish an AAC user's sentences, or avoid interaction altogether. Below are some tips to make communication between AAC and non-AAC users more comfortable and fruitful. These are adapted from the following sources: the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC), the Waisman Center, and Voice for Living.

  1. Treat AAC users as you would anyone else. Do not treat them as special or fragile.
  2. Never talk about someone who is present during a conversation. Talk to them.

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Free AAC Software for iPhone/iPodTouch/ iPad Devices

Many free alternative and augmentative communication (AAC) apps are available for the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. This article summarizes the capabilities of the most useful of these apps as well as providing links to the products' iTunes pages.

For an introduction to AAC, please see the articles on Alternative and Augmentative Communication--What Is It? and Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) -- What are the options?

Introduction

One benefit of using free apps is that they can be used to explore whether AAC is beneficial to an individual, and what type of AAC is beneficial, without requiring a financial commitment beyond the necessary hardware. They also tend to have simple designs so that they are very intuitive and can be used with little or no training or configuration.

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Developing Alternative/Augmentative Communication Layouts

Alternative and augmentative communication (AAC) require customization so that the device is appropriate to each user's capabilities and needs. This article covers the steps to take so that there is a good fit between the strategy and the user.

Establish what the user wants to communicate

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Broadband Access and How It Is Redefining Quality of Life Issues for People with Disabilities

Wednesday, March 23, 2011
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Pacific Standard Time

This webinar will present a general introduction and overview of Broadband—both as a public policy agenda and as a quality of life issue for people with disabilities. The training will review the unique ways in which Broadband is redefining health care, education, employment, citizenship, and community participation for people with disabilities.

Description: This webinar will present a general introduction and overview of Broadband—both as a public policy agenda and as a quality of life issue for people with disabilities. The training will review the unique ways in which Broadband is redefining health care, education, employment, citizenship, and community participation for people with disabilities.

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The iPad and Communication Transitions for Young Adults

Tuesday, December 13, 2011
9:00-10:00 Pacific Standard Time

As children who use communication devices become young adults, their environments, needs, and interests are likely to change quickly and dramatically. This webinar will take a look at how the vocabulary and equipment that they have previously used can change accordingly. 

Archived Webinar Description: As children who use communication devices become young adults, their environments, needs, and interests are likely to change quickly and dramatically. The vocabulary and equipment that they have previously used will need to change accordingly.

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Introduction to Assistive Technology

Thursday, February 17, 2011
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM PST

Assistive Technology is anything that bridges a gap between the goals and aptitudes of people with disabilities. In this training, we will take a look at assistive technology for use in the home, school, workplace, and community environments. We'll move from the simplest low tech through the most cutting-edge high tech, and provide suggestions on how to find solutions to meet any individual's needs.

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Alternative and Augmentative Communication--What Is It?

People may have difficulty speaking due to a physical injury or a disability (e.g., cerebral palsy), a cognitive impairment (such as brain injury or autism), or both physical and cognitive disabilities. Some of these people use alternative and augmentative communication (AAC) strategies for communication. This article covers the general principles of AAC; more information about specific strategies is in our article about Alternative and Augmentative Communication--What are the Options?

AAC needs to be matched to the user's physical and cognitive capabilities, but also to the immediacy of their communication needs. If someone is trying to communicate, it is better to quickly provide simple but reasonably effective strategies, such as a sheet of paper with pictures that she can point to, than to wait until more sophisticated options are available.

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Telecommunication Relay Service (TRS)

Telecommunication Relay Service (background article.

">TRS) is a family of free services that lets people who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind, or speech impaired independently place and receive phone calls.  A communication assistant (CA) "translates" between a text or sign language user on one side and a voice telephone user on the other.

This article covers the various types of relay services and how to use them.

background article.

">TRS includes:

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Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) -- What are the options?

The 'normal' way people communicate face-to-face is through talking. However, many people can't talk clearly, or can't talk at all. These people rely on various tools to help augment their limited talking ability, or to help them communicate in an alternate way --  'Alternative and Augmentative Communication' (AAC). These tools come in all shapes, sizes, and functionalities. This article provides a basic breakdown of the general AAC tool types.

Low-tech

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Who’s Who in Social Media: Pinterest, Blogs and Facebook Groups (AAC)

Monday, September 22, 2014
3:30 PM Pacific, 6:30 PM Eastern

The Special Ed. Tech. Center at Central Washington U. presents.

It seems like everybody has a pinterest page, facebook group or blog right now. Let’s participate in social media that has research based content and practical applications. This webinar will let you take a peek at the most popular social media links in the field of Speech, Language and AAC.

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