Information management

Section 508 Refresh - Using WCAG 2.0 to Evaluate Document Accessibility

Thursday, December 5th, 2013
11:30 AM Pacific, 2:30 PM Eastern

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines can help you catch barriers and more. From ADA Online Learning.

In 2010, the Board's Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) for Section 508 proposed to incorporate the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (also known as WCAG 2.0) for evaluating the accessibility of electronic documents. WCAG 2.0 is published and maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and is the internationally recognized standards for web accessibility.

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The Low Hanging Fruit of Web Accessibility

Monday, November 18th, 2013
11 AM Pacific, 2 PM Eastern

EASI presents the easiest ways to increase web and document access.

 

EASI presents Technology accessibility specialist Terrill Thompson, who will share a few simple steps that anyone can take to improve the accessibility and usability of their websites and electronic documents.

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Advanced Accessible PDF - Part 2: Tables, Forms, and More!

Thursday, November 21, 2013
11 AM Pacific, 2 PM Eastern

ADA National Network presents this 90 minute session.

Sometimes additional editing is needed to get your PDF fully accessible. This session will look at the Table and Form Editors, changing reading order for assistive devices, and new features in Acrobat XI. Participants should have a basic understanding of accessible PDF principles such as tagging and navigational structure.

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Comparison of LMS Systems Accessibility

Monday June 17th, 2013
11 AM Pacific, 2 PM Eastern

EASI presents a panel who surveyed accessibility of several popular LMS systems.

Several university adaptive technology professionals did a survey of the accessibility of several popular LMS systems. In this Webinar, they will explain the criteria used in the study, how it was done and explain the results. All of this has the caveat that these systems, as with everything digital, are change almost daily.

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Better Search Engine for Apps

Quixey.com is a new search engine for apps that moniters blogs, tweets, review sites, and articles in order to find out what each app can do. You can search by type of device and free vs. paid. You can search for Chrome extensions and apps, add ons for Firefox, Safari, and IE. It will find web apps and Salesforce apps as well.

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Use of Macros as an Accessibility Strategy

Macros are coded sets of instructions added to existing programs to change or enhance their functionality. In some cases, macros are easy to create and implement; in others, they may require sophisticated programming knowledge. This article talks about how macros can be used as an important accessibility tool and various ways to develop them.

Examples of Macro Use

  • Macros can be used to simplify the execution of complex functions, particularly those that need to be repeated. For example, users may need to go through documents imported from other sources to find and remove extraneous page breaks; a macro can be written to initiate and perform this process with a single key combination.

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Making Documents Accessible

Much information is available about website accessibility. However, documents in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and PDF can also be inaccessible to blind users, as well as some users with cognitive and physical disabilities. This article summarizes the accessibility process for several versions of the Microsoft products, and discusses multiple ways to address PDF accessibility.

 

What is Document Accessibility?

A document is accessible if users with disabilities can read and understand all essential information that it contains, whether or not they use assistive technology. In particular:

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Assistive Technology for People with Limited or No Use of Their Hands

This article provides an overview of alternative strategies that people with physical disabilities can use to augment or replace use of their hands.

Optimizing Hand Use

Many people, even those with severe difficulty using their hands, prefer to maximize their manual capabilities rather than use alternative strategies. Fortunately, there is a wide range of assistive technologies that can help with this:

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Touchscreen Use and Accessibility Issues

Touchscreens are becoming ubiquitous in mobile devices: tablets, smartphones, e-readers, etc. However, individuals who have either visual or dexterity disabilities (or both) may have difficulties using standard touchscreen technology. This article covers the types of problems that people may experience, as well as innovations that attempt to address these barriers.

Vision

Traditional touchscreen use, like mouse use, requires good hand/eye coordination. If users cannot see the target, they cannot activate it. This affects opening applications, using the virtual keyboard, and most other touch screen functions. Recent touchscreens have built-in solutions for this problem:

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