Independent Living Center

Free Computer AT Already in Macintosh Computers

The Macintosh OS X operating system built-in accessibility features to make the monitor, keyboard, or mouse easier to use for many people. This article provides information on these features, including how to turn them on and use them. Some of these features are also available in earlier Macintosh systems; please contact us if you would like more information. Another good resource on Macintosh accessibility is the AT Mac blog.

Mouse Assistance/Alternatives

MouseKeys

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Free Computer AT Already in Windows Computers

The Windows XP, Vista, 7, and 8 operating systems all include a wide range of built-in accessibility features. These can be activated to make the monitor, keyboard, or mouse easier to use for many people. This article provides information on these features, including how to turn them on and use them in all three versions of Windows. Most of these features are also available in earlier Windows systems.

Mouse Assistance/Alternatives

MouseKeys

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Touch-Free Devices for Indoor Use

Fixtures and devices that are responsive to motion rather than physical contact are becoming increasingly popular. These benefit not only people with dexterity disabilities, but also people with a fear of germs and people temporarily unable to use their hands because of injury or because they are holding books, groceries, or a baby. Many products are available in touch-free models; in some cases, modifications are available for existing products. Installation of these products is often a good strategy for complying with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations.

Toilets

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Broadband Access and How It Is Redefining Quality of Life Issues for People with Disabilities

Wednesday, March 23, 2011
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Pacific Standard Time

This webinar will present a general introduction and overview of Broadband—both as a public policy agenda and as a quality of life issue for people with disabilities. The training will review the unique ways in which Broadband is redefining health care, education, employment, citizenship, and community participation for people with disabilities.

Description: This webinar will present a general introduction and overview of Broadband—both as a public policy agenda and as a quality of life issue for people with disabilities. The training will review the unique ways in which Broadband is redefining health care, education, employment, citizenship, and community participation for people with disabilities.

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Telling Our Stories: Anthony Tusler

Tuesday, March 15, 2011
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Pacific Time

Telling Our Stories is a monthly webinar series that hosts people with disabilities sharing their stories of success and challenge. This month our guest speaker is Anthony Tusler, author and disability advocate.

Telling Our Stories is a monthly webinar series that hosts people with disabilities sharing their stories of success and challenge. This month our guest speaker is Anthony Tusler, author and disability advocate.

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Free Computer AT Already In Macintosh OSX And How To Use It!

Thursday, June 16, 2011
11:00 AM - 12:00 AM Pacific Standard Time

Apple OSX and iOS have a variety of built-in features useful to people with disabilities. This webinar will show you how to find these features and discuss what needs they can meet.

Description: Apple OSX and iOS have a variety of built-in features useful to people with disabilities. This webinar will show you how to find these features and understand what needs they can meet.

Learning Goals:

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The iPad and Communication Transitions for Young Adults

Tuesday, December 13, 2011
9:00-10:00 Pacific Standard Time

As children who use communication devices become young adults, their environments, needs, and interests are likely to change quickly and dramatically. This webinar will take a look at how the vocabulary and equipment that they have previously used can change accordingly. 

Archived Webinar Description: As children who use communication devices become young adults, their environments, needs, and interests are likely to change quickly and dramatically. The vocabulary and equipment that they have previously used will need to change accordingly.

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Writing Tools for People with Learning Disabilities

Some people with learning disabilities experience problems with writing (dysgraphia); this may include problems with specific words (e.g., spelling) or with generating ideas. Some writing tools are specifically designed for people with learning disabilities; others are built into mainstream products. They provide assistance with a wide range of needs, including optimizing on-screen and print formats, idea generation and organization, choosing the right word, and spelling, homophone, and grammar checking.

This article covers some of the mainstream and AT solutions to these writing problems.

Try It Yourself

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Staying Connected: Meet the Accessible Technology Coalition

Thursday, January 27, 2011
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM PST

You are invited to join this introduction to the Accessible Technology Coalition—a new model of information and training delivery to better serve the end-users of assistive technology. Funded in part by the California Emerging Technology Fund, ATC is a project of the Center for Accessible Technology (CforAT) in Berkeley, California. The vision of the Accessible Technology Coalition is to broaden the focus of assistive technology to include not only computer access, but all information and communication technologies.

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Captions on DVDs

Viewers of DVDs and Blu-ray disks usually have the option of viewing captions.

DVDs that have closed captions or subtitles may indicate that on the cover.  To turn captions on, go to the 'menu' on the DVD and look for the 'languages' category.  Either 'closed captions' (CC) or 'subtitles for deaf and hard of hearing' (SDH) will show up.  Select the option and proceed to play the DVD.

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