Hard of hearing

Captioning

Captions display the dialogue, narration, and sounds of a video program.  Captions can be found on broadcast programs, DVDs, online, or on any other video technology. They are used by viewers who are deaf or hard of hearing, and by people who are learning the language or who benefit from hearing and seeing the content at the same time.

This article explores the basics of captions.  There are other articles here for more specific topics, including how to add captions to a video you are producing.

TVs and Set-top Boxes

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Real-time Transcription

You may be familiar with the use of a sign language interpreter for a public meeting, classroom, or workplace activity.  But many people with hearing loss do not use sign language.  They may need a transcription or captioning service that displays the speaker’s words on a screen, called Communication Access Real-time Transcription or CART.  

A steno typist with special input equipment and a projector or computer monitor interface provides this service.

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Tips for Better Communication in Classrooms and Other Group Settings

Here are some ways to improve speech communication for hard of hearing people in a group situation:

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Assistive Listening Technology

People who are hard of hearing may have trouble hearing a speaker in a public auditorium or meeting room, even if they use hearing aids or have cochlear implants.  Assistive listening technology is a way your organization can improve the quality and volume of the audio delivered to these audience members.  There are many options. 

This article will cover some of the issues and solutions.

The basic idea of assistive listening systems is that the audio signal is collected and transmitted to units that "feed" into a person's hearing aids or cochlear implant.

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Billion Words March for Captioning

Billion Words March is a year-long campaign to champion access to streamed TV shows and movies for 360 million people worldwide with deafness and hearing loss. It's hosted by VIKI,  a global TV site powered by a volunteer community of fans who caption.

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iPhone-controlled Hearing Aids

Made-for-iPhone hearing aids come with a host of new features, including location specific adjustments, a "live microphone" feature that is good in noisy places, and spoken output from the iPhone delivered directly to the hearing aid. See a description at Re/Code.

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Institutional Guidelines on Captioning

Creating institutional guidance for faculties and staffs on captioning can be a tricky issue. This NCDAE blog post shares what others in the field have to say. It's based on a discussion on the Educause ITACCESS list and shares perspectives of several institutions.

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Amara (Universal Subtitles) New Services

Amara has announced new features to their caption platform services.

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Translating Conversations for People with Hearing Impairments: Speech to Text

Those that are deaf or hearing impaired want automatic speech to text but the technology is not there yet.

The Accessible Technology Coalition gets a lot of questions such as these:

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