Education

Audio Information Resources

People with visual or cognitive impairments can access materials in alternate formats such as large-print, braille and audio. Audio is a popular medium because it works with so many portable devices such as mp3 players, e-book readers, smartphones, and laptops. It's really a mainstream way of distributing content that people with disabilities are using, rather than a specialized channel.

Almost all types of content are available, although publishers may restrict access to some materials.

RoboBraille is a free web-based or email service that will convert digital text documents into mp3 audio files. Your file can be a .doc, .docx, .pdf, .txt, .xml, .html, .htm, .rtf, .epub, .mobi, etc..

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Captioning

Captions display the dialogue, narration, and sounds of a video program.  Captions can be found on broadcast programs, DVDs, online, or on any other video technology. They are used by viewers who are deaf or hard of hearing, and by people who are learning the language or who benefit from hearing and seeing the content at the same time.

This article explores the basics of captions.  There are other articles here for more specific topics, including how to add captions to a video you are producing.

TVs and Set-top Boxes

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Archived News from 2015 and prior

(News is now posted on the ATC Facebook page.)

Here is some old news:,

  • ISTE"s Past Inclusive Learning Network (ILN) Webinars include
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    Annual Review of AT Research

    Dave Edyburn has posted his annual review of the assisitive technology literature, including research on iPads, evidence-based practice, and research using SET.

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    Browse associated categories:

    Archived Webinar on AT and LD

    Learning Ally has more than 10 recently-archived webinars on LD, especially dyslexia, and AT.

    Titles include:

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    Assistive Technology for Reading Accommodations:From Low Tech to High–Tech

    Kirk Behnke and Mike Marotta of MAK Technology Solutions joined Learning Ally on 9/24/14 in a webinar focused on helping teachers understand the array of assistive technology solutions available to them to assist their students with a need for reading accommodations. These solutions range from the simple highlighter to browser extensions to simplify the reading of Web articles.

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    Google Chrome as Assistive Technology

    10/28/2014
    9 AM Pacific, 12 PM Eastern

    The Texas Assistive Technology Network presents Google Chrome apps and extensions that could be beneficial to ALL students.

    Did you know that 22% of US schools now use Chromebooks for students to complete tasks. How does this impact struggling students? In this webinar, we will explore an array of Google Chrome apps and extensions that could be beneficial to ALL students. By leveraging the power of this common browser, we can make significant customization to meet the needs of struggling students.

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    iPad: Accessibility

    Thursday, October 2, 2014
    3:30 PM Pacific, 6:30 PM Eastern

    Settings to enhance use by those with vision, hearing, learning, and physical and motor issue from the Special Ed. Tech. Center at Central Washington University.

    The iPad provides excellent accessibility features for students with disabilities.  These features address difficulties with vision, hearing, learning, and physical and motor.  Join this webinar to learn how to adjust the settings on your iPad to enhance usage for students with a variety of needs.  

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    Nexus: Android Apps for Sped

    Thursday, September 25, 2014
    3:30 PM Pacific, 6:30 PM Eastern

    Review the built-in features of the Nexus which are relevant to education, as well as consider the range of education Android apps. From SETC at Central Washington University.

    From its creation, the iPad has clearly been the tablet of choice in education;  However; tight budgets and the desire to be good stewards of state and federal funds require us to consider alternatives.  Is the Nexus a viable alternative to the iPad?  Based on price alone, the answer would be a resounding yes!   Is the answer the same when considering functionality and

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