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Captions on DVDs

Viewers of DVDs and Blu-ray disks usually have the option of viewing captions.

DVDs that have closed captions or subtitles may indicate that on the cover.  To turn captions on, go to the 'menu' on the DVD and look for the 'languages' category.  Either 'closed captions' (CC) or 'subtitles for deaf and hard of hearing' (SDH) will show up.  Select the option and proceed to play the DVD.

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Telecommunication Relay Service (TRS)

Telecommunication Relay Service (background article.

">TRS) is a family of free services that lets people who are deaf, hard of hearing, deaf-blind, or speech impaired independently place and receive phone calls.  A communication assistant (CA) "translates" between a text or sign language user on one side and a voice telephone user on the other.

This article covers the various types of relay services and how to use them.

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">TRS includes:

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Captions on Popular Online Video Sites

Online videos have grown in number and importance to the point where deaf, hard of hearing, and other people who need captions are seriously disadvantaged if those captions are not available. For example, some educational institutions offer online training that includes videos, but these are often not available. And of course most informal videos, such as family reunions or school plays, are hardly ever captioned.

Adding to this problem is the fact that there are many different video formats, and the most popular online video sites use different interfaces to control playback.

However, there are some improvements in online captioning, and more progress is on the way. This article covers how to find and view captioned videos online.

Captioning of video websites varies since there is no legal requirement to caption "consumer-generated" videos.  Federal government agencies do have to caption their online videos under Section 508, and a

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Captioning

Captions display the dialogue, narration, and sounds of a video program.  Captions can be found on broadcast programs, DVDs, online, or on any other video technology. They are used by viewers who are deaf or hard of hearing, and by people who are learning the language or who benefit from hearing and seeing the content at the same time.

This article explores the basics of captions.  There are other articles here for more specific topics, including how to add captions to a video you are producing.

TVs and Set-top Boxes

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Real-time Transcription

You may be familiar with the use of a sign language interpreter for a public meeting, classroom, or workplace activity.  But many people with hearing loss do not use sign language.  They may need a transcription or captioning service that displays the speaker’s words on a screen, called Communication Access Real-time Transcription or CART.  

A steno typist with special input equipment and a projector or computer monitor interface provides this service.

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Billion Words March for Captioning

Billion Words March is a year-long campaign to champion access to streamed TV shows and movies for 360 million people worldwide with deafness and hearing loss. It's hosted by VIKI,  a global TV site powered by a volunteer community of fans who caption.

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YouTube Improves Video Captioning Editor

YouTube has again improved the functionality of their captioning tool for videos that you have posted on the site. The instructions are much the same but now, as you caption, the site will automatically pause the video while you are typing.

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Institutional Guidelines on Captioning

Creating institutional guidance for faculties and staffs on captioning can be a tricky issue. This NCDAE blog post shares what others in the field have to say. It's based on a discussion on the Educause ITACCESS list and shares perspectives of several institutions.

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Amara (Universal Subtitles) New Services

Amara has announced new features to their caption platform services.

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