Adolescent/Transition

Changing Lives of People with Disabilities in Ecuador- the CITTI Project

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Pacific Daylight Time

 

Learn about how the CITTI (Community Inclusion Through Technology International) Project has brought AT, OT, SLP, and other professionals to meet with families and those who work with people who have disabilities in Ecuador. 

 

Bridgett Perry shares some great slides of low tech options using very low cost or free materials.

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How Stephen Hawking Uses a Computer (Switches and Scanning)

You might wonder how Stephen Hawking can operate his computer and tell it what to say. He uses a single switch activated by the movement of a muscle in his cheek along with some specialized software that presents choices that narrow down to what he wants to say or do. This article discusses the range of switches and related software that allow anyone with a single consistent motion they can control to use a computer.

Switches

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Assistive Technology and Employment

Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which covers employment, specifically covers “purchase of equipment or modifications to existing equipment” as an appropriate accommodation that would allow someone with a disability to accept or retain a job. This article covers how to use information from the ATC and elsewhere to determine what equipment may be appropriate for meeting an employee’s needs.

New Strategies

An employee or potential employee may not have prior experience using accommodations, and may not know what strategies or equipment will best meet their needs. You can search ATC for information about possible solutions based on the following criteria:

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Making Documents Accessible

Much information is available about website accessibility. However, documents in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and PDF can also be inaccessible to blind users, as well as some users with cognitive and physical disabilities. This article summarizes the accessibility process for several versions of the Microsoft products, and discusses multiple ways to address PDF accessibility.

 

What is Document Accessibility?

A document is accessible if users with disabilities can read and understand all essential information that it contains, whether or not they use assistive technology. In particular:

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Access to Videos

This article provides an overview of the issues people may have when accessing videos online, in theaters, and from DVD or Blu-Ray players, and the solutions that have been developed to address these. 

Barriers to Video Access

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Assistive Technology for People with Limited or No Use of Their Hands

This article provides an overview of alternative strategies that people with physical disabilities can use to augment or replace use of their hands.

Optimizing Hand Use

Many people, even those with severe difficulty using their hands, prefer to maximize their manual capabilities rather than use alternative strategies. Fortunately, there is a wide range of assistive technologies that can help with this:

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Facilitated Communication for AAC Users

Facilitated communication (FC) is a controversial strategy for helping individuals with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Some claim that it gives people a voice for the first time, while others claim that the facilitator, not the AAC user, is actually doing the communicating. This article describes FC and presents arguments from both sides of the controversy.

What is Facilitated Communication (FC)?

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Etiquette in Communicating with AAC Users

Because communication using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) may be much slower or more difficult to understand than standard speech, many people may try to interrupt to finish an AAC user's sentences, or avoid interaction altogether. Below are some tips to make communication between AAC and non-AAC users more comfortable and fruitful. These are adapted from the following sources: the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC), the Waisman Center, and Voice for Living.

  1. Treat AAC users as you would anyone else. Do not treat them as special or fragile.
  2. Never talk about someone who is present during a conversation. Talk to them.

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Using Pictures in Mainstream Communication Programs

Adding pictures to standard communication tools such as address books may provide important visual cues for people with learning or other cognitive disabilities -- users can contact people without knowing how to read or write their names. This article contains information on ways that Macintosh and Windows computers and mobile devices support this feature.

Adding Pictures to Email Address Books

Macintosh

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